This Week in Math Ed: December 30, 2016

Here it is, TWiME 52, the last of the year. I didn't know how far I'd get when I started, and there were times during the year I wasn't sure it was worth continuing. But I'm glad I stuck with it, and I plan to continue in 2017. Big thanks to all of you who have read and shared it!

Math Ed Said

December 23: For a second day in a row, "The High-School Mathematician's Crutch Is Not Allowed in Most Colleges" was the most-shared link on my math ed Twitter list.

Shared by: Michelle Russell, Robert Talbert, Anthony Purcell, Earl Samuelson, Shauna Hedgepeth, Amy Hogan, John Golden, Dan Anderson, Dan Allen

December 24: How cool (and very last-minute) was this? Paula Beardell Krieg took images from math teachers on Twitter and created "Last Minute Wrapping Paper."

Shared by: Mike Lawler, John Golden, Malke Rosenfeld, Simon Gregg

December 25: Yes, people were sharing links on Christmas Day. In this case, they were linking to more links, specifically these from the Ontario Math Links blog for the week ending December 23rd.

Shared by: Kyle Pearce, Bridget Dunbar, Mary Bourassa, David Petro

December 26: In Episode 1621 of the Math Ed Podcast, Samuel Otten interviewed Megan Taylor about her JRME commentary, "From Effective Curricula Toward Effective Curriculum Use."

Shared by: Egan Chernoff, John Golden, Samuel Otten

December 27: Did you hear about Tracy Zager's new book, Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You'd Had? People were talking about it on the 27th (when they weren't talking about Carrie Fisher).

Shared by: Andrew Gael, Crystal Lancour, Jill Gough, John Golden, Sahar Khatri, David Coffey, Dan Meyer

December 28: Kyle Pearce wrote, "Exploring Fraction Constructs and Proportional Reasoning." It's a post rich with all sorts of part-whole relationships, number line placements, concrete and visual representations, and operations.

Shared by: Crystal Lancour, Dan Allen, David Petro, Mark Chubb, Kyle Pearce, Matthew Oldridge

Annie Fetter at Innov8 2016
December 29: Suzanne Alejandre, Max Ray-Riek, and Annie Fetter, while working fall conferences for The Math Forum, posted bulletin boards in common spaces titled "Ask the NCTM Community." Suzanne's blog post here lists the questions and responses written on those boards, which has prompted maybe the best and most active comment section I've seen to any blog post in a long time.

Shared by: Megan Schmidt, Casey McCormick, Suzanne Alejandre, The Math Forum, Earl Samuelson, Gary Davis, Max Ray-Riek

Around the Math Ed Web

A quick check on the Global Math Department shows these recent and upcoming sessions:
I found a tweet from NCTM that says there will be a #TCMchat, #MTMSchat, and #MTchat in January on the 11th, 18th, and 25th, respectively, but no details about the articles. I also learned that one person used #TCMchat over the holiday while watching Turner Classic Movies.

Research Notes

The January 2017 issue of Educational Studies in Mathematics is out:
Three more articles have been added to the March 2017 issue of The Journal of Mathematical Behavior:
Some journals seemed to hurry up to get their last 2016 issue out before the end of the year. For the International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, they jumped to put out both their January and February 2017 issues. Here's the math-focused articles:
Whereas IJSME got out in front of 2017, AERA just squeezed out the March 2016 issue of the Review of Research in Education. It's a bit confusing, but RRE is really only published once a year, so the "March" timing is irrelevant. This year, there is one math-related article by Alan Schoenfeld, and it's a survey of the field — and open access!
Here's the newest from the January 2017 and February 2017 issues of Teaching and Teacher Education:
For the Twitter crowd, there are some familiar faces in the latest Journal of Urban Mathematics Education:

Math Ed in the News

The theme this week seems to be "teach math through music/philosophy/news/anythingotherthanmath."

Math Ed in Colorado

I only have two reminders, which I'll keep short:

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