This Week in Math Ed: May 20, 2016

Math Ed Said

May 13: The first time I saw "WODB" (Which One Doesn't Belong?) mentioned on Twitter, I wasn't quite sure what to make of it. But when you see it in action, skillfully facilitated, you get it. Tracy Zager shared with us "Straight but Wiggled," in which a bunch of first graders make sense of ideas like "diamond," "straight," and "vertiwiggle." If you're familiar with Paul Cobb et al.'s work on the emergence of sociomathematical norms in classroom group activity, it makes it extra interesting to see what happens here.

Shared by: Tracy Johnston Zager, Ilona Vashchyshyn, Bridget Dunbar, Malke Rosenfeld, Kent Haines, Simon Gregg, David Butler, Mark Chubb, John Golden, A. O. Fradkin, Bryan Anderson, Laura Wagenman, Pat Power

May 14: If you're looking for Ignite talks from the 2016 NCTM Annual Meeting, or prior meetings, you can find them at The Math Forum.

Shared by: Suzanne Alejandre, Peg Cagle, The Math Forum, Tracy Johnston Zager, Amie Albrecht

May 15: It's a return appearance for the Ontario Math Links, this time for the week ending May 13th, 2016.

Shared by: David Petro, Mary Bourassa, Matthew Oldridge, Kyle Pearce, Jon Orr, Ryan Smith, Cathy Yenca

May 16: Jon Orr describes "Double Clothesline – Solving Equations," a very nice approach to understanding solving equations. Instead of a balance or algebra tiles, this uses double number lines in a way that gives more focus to the quantitites, rather than choosing or performing operations.

Shared by: Jon Orr, Shelley Carranza, Kyle Pearce, David Petro, Alex Overwijk, Pam Wilson, Lisa Lunney Borden, John Gibson

Dan Meyer
May 17: Dan Meyer is thinking about the informal that supports the formal understanding, which he illustrates in the post "Blue Point Rule." This is familiar territory for those of us who study Realistic Mathematics Education and its approach of progressive formalization. RME uses the terms "informal," "preformal," and "formal," and what Dan's wrestling with is what I'd call the "preformal" in RME. It's important that we call it out because it's really tough to make that last transition from a preformal model or conception to the use of a formal equation or rule. Dan's collecting "Before I ask for (Formal X), I ask for (Informal Y)" statements, some of which hint at common models used in RME.

Shared by: Dan Meyer, Bridget Dunbar, Jon Orr, Imtiaz Damji, Chris Mueller, Carrie Diaz Eaton, Mark Chubb, Nancy Terry, Jamie Duncan, Michael Fenton, Eddi Vulić, Rob Horcher, Missy Stringham, Levi Patrick, Rob Horcher, Jessica Faurote, Regan Galvan, Tim McCaffrey, Martin Joyce

May 18: There were 14 more shares of Dan's "Blue Point Rule" post, but I didn't want that post to completely overshadow this post by Matt Larson, which also got (re)tweeted a lot on the 17th and 18th. "NCTM Is Its Members" talks about NCTM understanding the needs of its members and what they're doing to meet them. I'm pretty excited about some of the directions NCTM is going, and they're moving a bit faster than I expected when I was thinking about these issues a while back. If you have feedback and ideas for Matt and NCTM, be sure to go to the post and leave them. You can see what other people have said and Matt's replies, and it looks like a pretty good discussion so far.

Matt Larson

Shared by: Lisa Henry, Amanda Jansen, TCM - NCTM, NCTM, NCTM - MT, April Pforts, UNL NebraskaMATH

May 19: The Chalkbeat story "How one Tennessee school district is getting students excited about math" describes number talks in a 1st grade classroom.

Shared by: John Golden, Melissa Soto, Donna Boucher, NCTM, Gary Petko

Around the Math Ed Web

A few more links popped up this week that I think are too good to pass up:
I'm eager to listen to Sam Otten's podcast with Thomas Carpenter. The episode is 28 minutes long and if I had 28 minutes to talk with Tom Carpenter, I probably wouldn't get past 1970. I'm guessing Sam did better than that.



In the Global Math Department last week, Tracy Zager gave a talk called, "How Do They Relate? Teaching Students to Make Mathematical Connections." Next week, Yana Weinstein and Cindy Wooldridge will talk about "Improving Math Education with Interleaved Problems by Global Math Department."

Deadlines: NCSM Annual on June 1 and RUME on August 19th and December 2nd (for posters).

Research Notes

The June 2016 issue of ZDM has arrived, with the theme Cognitive Neuroscience and Mathematics Learning — Revisited After Five Years:
I see one math article was just added to the August 2016 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education:
There's also a new issue of the Mathematics Education Research Journal:
New in AERA Open:
I don't watch Urban Education on a week-to-week basis for math ed articles, but recently a few caught my eye, so here's what I found published either this year or in upcoming issues:

Math Ed in the News

Do you remember that thing I put in last week's news section? No, you didn't, because there wasn't a news section! Somehow it slipped by unnoticed. But here's some news for you this week:

Math Ed in Colorado

The highlight of my week was attending the Colorado Mathematics Awards at the Grant-Humphreys Mansion in Denver. Organized by Richard Gibbs, David Carlson, and the CMA steering committee, this event recognizes students for outstanding performance in MATHCOUNTS, the American Mathematics Contents 8, 10, and 12, Moody's Mega Math Challenge, the USA Mathematics Olympiads, the American Regions Mathematics League, the William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition, the International Contest in Modeling, the Interdisciplinary Contest in Modeling, and some teaching awards. Whew, did I remember them all? It was great to see students ages middle school through college all being recognized for their outstanding work, and the fact that Colorado has a special event that brings all these people together is really something to be proud of.

The packed house at the Grant-Humphreys Mansion for the 2016 Colorado Mathematics Awards

While it was great to join everyone in this event in its 21st year, I think a big challenge going forward is to make sure opportunities to participate on math teams and in math competitions gets spread across all of Colorado. As a former MATHCOUNTS kid from a 5200-person rural town in Iowa, I noticed that most of the awardees were students from large, high-SES schools on the Front Range. I realize I only saw the winners, not all the participants, but the small-towner in me would love to see some students there representing places like Gunnison, Ordway, and Walden. Geographic diversity is one of a number of struggles concerning math competitions, so if you'd like to expand the opportunity to participate in math competitions at your school, let me know and I'll see if I can get you connected to people who can help.

In the News:
PD opportunities:
Job openings:
  • Platte Canyon High School in Bailey, CO, needs a math teacher for grades 9-12. At this time, the schedule includes Algebra 1 and several honors classes, including Precalculus. Bailey is a beautiful, small mountain community about an hour southwest of Denver and PCHS enrolls about 300 students. Class sizes are in the twenties or lower. Please apply to www.plattecanyonschools.org.
  • Lake County School District in Leadville is looking for a 7th and 8th grade math teacher. If you are interested in joining a math department that combines Jo Boaler's work with Expeditionary Learning while living in a small town in the mountains, this job is for you. More information and an application can be found at their website. (Update 5/23: Position filled!)

This Week in Math Ed: May 13, 2016

Math Ed Said

May 6: "Why Math Education Doesn't Add Up" along with a radio interview with Steven Strogatz appeared on PRI's Innovation Hub. Strogatz grapples with a tough truth: In general, most everyone gets through their adult lives just fine without using much of the high school math they were required to take. And yet while we all forget the quadratic formula, without consequence, we seem to collectively struggle with essential numeracy.

Shared by: Steven Strogatz, Dan Anderson, John Golden, Dan Meyer, Malyn Mawby, Dan Anderson, Jocelyn Dagenais, MathDDSB, OCTM, Steve Phelps, Earl Samuelson, Dan Allen

May 7: If there's been a more bizarrely disappointing story this year to hit TWiME, I can't remember it. "Ivy League economist ethnically profiled, interrogated for doing math on American Airlines flight" describes xenophobia and paranoia run amok.

Shared by: Kent Haines, Egan J Chernoff, Earl Samuelson, Francis Su, Michael Welch, Allison Krasnow, Shannon Houghton, Dave Richeson, Megan Schmidt, Robin Hosemann, Sahar Khatri, Amy Hogan, solve my maths, Nick Yates, Adrian Pumphrey, Andy Zsiga, Shannon Houghton, Eddi Vulić, Spencer Bagley, Keith Devlin, David Petro, T R, Ralph Pantozzi, Robbyn Glinsmann, Linda Hoang

May 8: Is this awkward? I feel like this is awkward. (Just kidding!) Somehow I didn't discover the weekly "Ontario Math Links" posts until a month or two ago, after I started TWiME. The Ontario Math Links predates TWiME by several years, and it's really my fault for not knowing about it. I'm happy to say that my posts and their posts are more complementary than redundant. The Ontario Math Links for the week ending May 6th, for example, highlights resources shared and talked about during the annual conference of the Ontario Association for Mathematics Education, something that didn't come up on TWiME.

Shared by: David Petro, Heather Theijsmeijer, Mark Chubb, Jon Orr, Matthew Oldridge, Kyle Pearce, Jennifer Lawler, Mary Bourassa, Laura Wheeler

May 9: On Monday people were (re)tweeting a post by John Rowe called "The Best Worksheet I have ever (re)written." It uses the "reversing the question" method credited to Fawn Nguyen to take some pretty run-of-the-mill textbook problems and give them some new direction.

Shared by: Jon Orr, Mary Bourassa, Eddi Vulić, Shelley Carranza, Amy Scales, Fawn Nguyen, WMC - WI MathCouncil, TODOS

May 10: Tuesday is Global Math Department day, and people were excited for Carl Oliver's "Teaching the Mathematical Practices Through Non-Routine Problems."

Shared by: Mary Gambrel, Global Math, Carl Oliver, Sharon Vestal, Geoff Krall, Megan Schmidt, April Pforts, Kent Haines

May 11: Instead of listening so much to Andrew Hacker, Patrick Honner says "When it Comes to Math Teaching, Let's Listen to Math Teachers."

Commentary: Listening to math teachers is a big part of my job. It's probably my favorite part. I agree with Patrick, that we should be listening to math teachers. But I also want to point out that listening isn't the same as getting answers, and you won't need to listen to very many math teachers in order to find differences in opinion. But in and of itself, that is one great reason to listen — the needs, wants, and beliefs of the math teaching community are not distributed evenly. Debates about the value of the content we teach existed before Hacker's name showed up in the New York Times, and math teachers will still be debating it long after the paperbacks of Hacker's book are cleared from the bargain bin. In fact, everyone should read The Saber-Tooth Curriculum (1939) to see how, possibly, some form of the Hacker debate has been happening since the dawn of mankind. From the math teachers I've been listening to (like here and elsewhere), this particular debate plays out more or less just as you'd expect: a system designed to open opportunities to more students (by putting more on a path to calculus) might inadvertently now be too restrictive and out-of-date (by making our mathematical pathways too narrow). It's a debate worth having, and Hacker is welcome to add his voice, but listening too much to any one voice is not a very good formula for progress.

Shared by: Math for America, Dan Anderson, Kate Nowak, Elizabeth Statmore, Ilana Horn, Tim Hudson, Jennifer Lawler, Keith Devlin, David Butler, Kathy H, James Tanton, Peg Cagle, Bowen Kerins, John Allen Paulos, Jack Brown

May 12: People were still buzzing about Patrick's post from the 11th, but not far behind were tweets about "Twitter 6000," a set of resources courtesy of the ATM.

Shared by: ATM, Learning Maths, The NCETM, solve my maths, Laura T, Danny Brown, Simon Gregg, Helen Williams

Around the Math Ed Web

I mentioned Carl Oliver's Global Math talk above, and next week you should be on the lookout for "How Do They Relate? Teaching Students to Make Mathematical Connections by Global Math Department" by Tracy Zager.

Proposal deadlines:
  • NCTM Research Conference: Not yet announced
  • NCSM Annual Conference: June 1, 2016
  • AMTE Annual Conference: May 15, 2016
  • RUME Conference: There are two deadlines for the Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education Conference: August 19, 2016 is the deadline for preliminary, theoretical, and contributed reports, and December 2, 2016, is the deadline for poster reports, and that has rolling acceptances. The next RUME conference is February 23-25, 2017, in San Diego.

Research Notes

First up is the June 2016 issue of the International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education:
From AERA Open:
The first articles of 2016 for the International Journal for Mathematics Teaching and Learning (from Plymouth University in the UK and the College of Nyiregyháza, Hungary) has these open-access items:
The first 2016 issue of the Journal of Statistics Education is now available, looking all bright and shiny on its new Taylor & Francis home. Annoyingly, the shiny new home does a lousy job at telling me where the authors are from, when it tells me at all.
A lone new article has appeared in the very specialized Technology Innovations in Statistics Education:

Math Ed in Colorado

It isn't math-specific, but you should be aware that CDE is conducting an Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) listening tour around Colorado. There's still a lot of ESSA details to work out for CDE and districts alike, so if you want to know more or have some input, these meetings are a great place to start.

PD opportunities:
Job openings:
  • NEW: Platte Canyon High School in Bailey, CO, needs a math teacher for grades 9-12. At this time, the schedule includes Algebra 1 and several honors classes, including Precalculus. Bailey is a beautiful, small mountain community about an hour southwest of Denver and PCHS enrolls about 300 students. Class sizes are in the twenties or lower. Please apply to www.plattecanyonschools.org.
  • Eagle Valley HS (Eagle County) is looking for a teacher certified to teach dual enrollment courses. Applicants who have taken masters-level math courses and can be credentialed with CMC to teach dual enrollment courses will receive strong consideration. See the school website for more information and here to apply for the job.
  • Lake County School District in Leadville is looking for a 7th and 8th grade math teacher. If you are interested in joining a math department that combines Jo Boaler's work with Expeditionary Learning while living in a small town in the mountains, this job is for you. More information and an application can be found at their website.

This Week in Math Ed: May 6, 2016

Math Ed Said

April 29: The New York Times featured a story and set of graphs titled "Money, Race and Success: How Your School District Compares." The title is a little misleading, as the expert in the study specifically warns against using this data for ranking. What you should really be getting from this story is the sheer pervasiveness of inequality that's predicted by race and income, regardless of place. These are not problems you can just say happen somewhere else.

Shared by: Thad Domina, Eric Milou, Tracy Johnston Zager, Jose Vilson, Mike Lawler, Steve Phelps, Regan Galvan, Michael Welch

April 30: The Curriculum Matters blog in Education Week ran a story a couple weeks ago asking, "The Search for Common-Core Curricula: Where Are Teachers Finding Materials?" I seem to frequently find myself in conversations about curriculum coherence and the cobbling together of materials teachers are either finding or developing themselves. This post summarizes some findings from a RAND Corporation study, and it's good to get some numbers to go with the stories I've been hearing about curriculum selection and use.

Shared by: Amy Hogan, Tracy Johnston Zager, Taylor Belcher, Rob Horcher, Megan Schmidt

May 1: "Reflections on a Career in Teaching" is a great post by David Bressoud, who finished his last teaching assignment this semester. David admits that most of the important lessons he's learned by teaching are ones many others already new, but that there's no replacement for digging in and doing the work yourself.

Shared by: MAA, Patrick Honner, Natalya St. Clair, Francis Su, Egan J Chernoff, TJ Hitchman, Ilona Vashchyshyn, Peg Cagle, Warren J. Code, Dan McQuillan, Joshua Bowman

May 2: Graham Fletcher's ShadowCon talk, "Becoming a Better Storyteller," is now online and was the focus of a Twitter chat. Graham mixes a few messages here, but my overall takeaway is the need to shake ourselves of our assumptions about what our math curriculum should include. I went through a moment like this a few years ago when I went looking for mentions of absolute value in the Common Core State Standards. Yes, absolute value is in the standards, but I couldn't find anything about solving absolute value equations. Graham shows in his talk that there's no call in the CCSS to simplify fractions. What can you find (or not find) in your standards?

Shared by: Graham Fletcher, Joe Schwartz, Nanette Johnson, Robert Kaplinsky, Sahar Khatri, Mike Flynn, Andrew Gael, Dan Meyer, Rusty Anderson, NCTM, Zak Champagne, Mark Chubb, Laura Wagenman, Sara VanDerWerf, casey

May 3: How had I not heard of Eugenia Cheng? If you don't know who she is, see this feature in The New York Times: "Eugenia Cheng Makes Math a Piece of Cake."

Shared by: Earl Samuelson, Sara Delano Moore, MAA, Egan J Chernoff, Gary Davis, Peg Cagle, Ilona Vashchyshyn, Patrick Honner, Dan Meyer

May 4: Wednesday was Kaneka Turner's turn to have her ShadowCon talk featured and chatted about on Twitter. "Extending the Invitation to Be "Good" at Math. For me, I was "invited to the math party" in about seventh grade — I was asked to join the MathCounts team and spent my study halls helping my math teacher check homework, organize for class, and design class activities. I've been pointed in the same general direction pretty much ever since.

Shared by: Robert Kaplinsky, Crystal Lancour, NCTM, Mike Flynn, Brian Bushart, Annie Fetter, Kaneka Turner, Rusty Anderson, Mike Flynn, Andrew Gael, pam j wilson, Mrs. Ritzi

Geoff Krall at the 2015 NCTM Annual Meeting
May 5: Geoff Krall shared a rather nice classroom routine for facilitating questioning during student presentations. Instead of a tuned-out audience, some students become panelists who confer with other students to develop sharper questions. I won't bother explaining it, as Geoff did a great job and included classroom diagrams that nicely communicate the idea.

Shared by: Geoff Krall, Bridget Dunbar, Robert Kaplinsky, David Butler, Brian Marks, Erica Litke, Kristin Gray, Regan Galvan, Shannon Andrews

Around the Math Ed Web

The deadlines for submitting proposals for the NCTM Annual Meeting and AMATYC have passed, but there are other dates on the horizon:
  • NCTM Research Conference: Not yet announced
  • NCSM Annual Conference: June 1, 2016
  • AMTE Annual Conference: May 15, 2016
  • RUME Conference: There are two deadlines for the Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education Conference: August 19, 2016 is the deadline for preliminary, theoretical, and contributed reports, and December 2, 2016, is the deadline for poster reports, and that has rolling acceptances. The next RUME conference is February 23-25, 2017, in San Diego.
Last week Kent Haines presented "A Conceptual Approach to Teaching Integer Operations by Global Math Department" at the Global Math Department. This Tuesday, we'll see Carl Oliver present "Teaching the Mathematical Practices Through Non-Routine Problems by Global Math Department."

Research Notes

There are only new articles from two journals this week, but they're from what some would say are the two most prominent journals. First, the May 2016 issue of the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education is out:
The June 2016 issue of Educational Studies in Mathematics has also arrived:

Math Ed in the News


Math Ed in Colorado

Last Saturday I attended a CCTM board meeting, and I really appreciate the amount of attention and detail that goes into trying to represent Colorado's math teachers the best we can. There were also a few resources shared that you should know about:
  • The GAIMME Report gives guidelines for mathematical modeling.
  • NCTM's ARCs are multi-lesson resources that bring together previous NCTM resources with new materials, activities, and structures to give them more coherence.
There was a problem with the CCTM election, so if you are a CCTM member please watch for an email with details about how to re-vote.

Yesterday, I attended the last Colorado Math Leaders (CML) meeting of the year. Similar to the CCTM meeting, a lot of conversation comes around to making sure anyone who wants to participate in CML can, whether it be in person, the listserv, or other activities we might hold. If you're a math leader in your district — regardless of what title you officially hold — let me know if you want to know more about CML.

NCTM is offering two summer institutes this summer in Denver:
Job openings:
  • NEW: Eagle Valley HS (Eagle County) is looking for a teacher certified to teach dual enrollment courses. Applicants who have taken masters-level math courses and can be credentialed with CMC to teach dual enrollment courses will receive strong consideration. See the school website for more information and here to apply for the job.
  • Lake County School District in Leadville is looking for a 7th and 8th grade math teacher. If you are interested in joining a math department that combines Jo Boaler's work with Expeditionary Learning while living in a small town in the mountains, this job is for you. More information and an application can be found at their website.
On a personal note, I'd like to congratulate two of my math ed grad school colleagues, Fred Peck and Ryan Grover, for earning their PhDs yesterday. Both defended their dissertations last summer, so this wasn't news, but it was great to see them recognized at the graduation ceremony. Fred is now an assistant professor at the University of Montana (and has an article in ESM, mentioned above), and Ryan is a post-doctoral researcher at CU-Boulder, working on multiple projects designed to help preservice and inservice teachers.

Fred Peck (with David Webb, advisor)

Ryan Grover (with David Webb, advisor)

This Week in Math Ed: April 29, 2016

In putting together this week's TWiME, I'm struck by how much great material is being shared from the NCTM Annual Meeting, and by how many people are sharing it. Putting these posts together is taking longer because popular links are being shared by 10, 20, or more people rather than three or five. That's great! This has more people thinking about future directions for NCTM, and how together we can be a stronger and better community of mathematics educators.

Math Ed Said

April 22: If you missed Dan Meyer's talk from NCTM, here's your chance to see it. The talk is called "Beyond Relevance & Real World: Stronger Strategies for Student Engagement" and it contains some very practical advice for exploiting the fact that we're not limited to presenting all of a problem at once like textbook publishers have had to do on paper. If you're thinking you'd like to take Dan's ideas and use them with teachers in professional development, let me also suggest checking out these materials from the Primas project (adapted from Swan & Pead, 2008). There, they are called "unstructured problems," and the materials include examples as well as guides for teacher enactment and reflection.

Shared by: Nancy Terry, Dan Meyer, Peps Mccrea, Patty Stephens, Bryan Anderson, Craig Barton, Kyle Pearce, Robert Kaplinsky, Greg George, Damion Beth, Marilyn Burns, Danielle Reycer, danny brown, Jennifer Blinzler, Mark Chubb, MathDDSB, Math with Matthew, Rusty Anderson, Stephanie Ling, Keith Devlin, Andrew Gael

April 23: The post "How to help your kids fall in love with math: a guide for grown-ups" makes me think about how important our definitions of mathematics are. For me, I generally define math as "the human activity of reasoning with quantity, shape, and patterns," so as long as I'm doing that kind of reasoning, then I recognize that I'm doing mathematics. When we think of mathematics that way, it's easier to value the kind of activities children can do (and often do unprovoked) and support them with their reasoning.

Shared by: Peg Cagle, Malke Rosenfeld, Janice Novakowski, Christopher Danielson, Brian Bushart, Mark Chubb, Sunil Singh, Christina Sherman, Jennifer Lawler

April 24: Kristin Gray shared, "RTI for Adults," a post that reflects her thinking about the type of intervention and supports we offer those who might struggle and how we might deal with unintended consequences.

Shared by: Kristin Gray, Jennifer Lawler, Anna, Janice Novakowski, Jamie Duncan, Kent Haines, Andrew Gael, Mark Chubb, Laura Wagenman, Tracy Johnston Zager, Tim Hudson, Nicora Placa, Shelley Carlisle, Nathan Kraft, Anne Schwartz, Brian Bushart

Gail Burrill at the 2016 ASSM Annual Meeting
April 25: Gail Burrill is hearing voices. Don't worry, it's okay, and it will make sense if you watch her ShadowCon talk, "Math Is Awesome: Let's Teach so Our Students Get It." Gail is talking about seeking out knowledge and inspiration, and reminding ourselves of ways we can be doing better as teachers.

Shared by: Dan Meyer, Jedidiah Butler, Megan Schmidt, Ilana Horn, Bob Lochel, Zak Champagne, Brian Bushart, NCTM, Ron King, Rusty Anderson, John Golden

April 26: A bunch of people shared this on the 25th, but it was the top share on the 26th, too. "Stop telling kids you're bad at math. You are spreading math anxiety 'like a virus.'" appeared in the Washington Post and was written by Petra Bonfert-Taylor, a Dartmouth engineering professor.

Shared by: Markus Sagebiel, Camsie McAdams, Shannon Houghton, Egan Chernoff, Sherri Adler, Regina Barrett, Amy Spies, Chris Robinson, Jeff de Varona, Anthony Purcell, NikolaJL, Clint Chan, POWER Org Math

April 27: A lot of people were sharing Robert Kaplinsky's ShadowCon talk, "Empower." No, it's not a pun related to exponents. It's about something more important — it's about ways in which we lead and the dynamics between power and influence, both broadly and within schools and classrooms.

Shared by: Zak Champagne, NCTM, Mary Bourassa, Robert Kaplinsky, John Berray, Kaneka Turner, Michael Fenton, Bob Lochel, Kristin Gray, Brian Bushart, Megan Schmidt, Jamie Duncan, Graham Fletcher, Laura Wagenman, Elham Kazemi, mathzone, Heather Kohn, Henri Picciotto, Mark Chubb

April 28: In another ShadowCon talk, Rochelle Gutiérrez asks us to "Stand Up for Students." Rochelle asked us to think about the students we're not serving well, to examine how we view math and power, and then gives a list of 10 things educators need to know about mathematics. Related: If you're looking for more explanation about why Rochelle asks us to use the term "emerging bilinguals," I suggest this article by Ofelia García.

Shared by: NCTM, Rochelle Gutierrez, Sadie Estrella, Robert Kaplinsky, April Pforts, Mike Flynn, Brian Bushart, Dan Meyer, Matt Larson, Rusty Anderson, Megan Schmidt, Kaneka Turner, Christina Sherman, Sharon Vestal, Bryan Meyer

Around the Math Ed Web

Have you submitted your proposals? If you want to present at these conferences, here are the due dates:
How about one more: The American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC) is holding their annual conference in Denver from November 17-20, 2016 and the deadline to submit for the poster session is May 1.

Sam Otten is looking for some informed opinions:
Last week in the Global Math Department we heard about Coding in Math Class from Dawn DuPriest. (Fun fact: I didn't recognize Dawn from her Twitter profile picture, but I recognize the mountains in her header photo. That's Mt. Lincoln on the left and North Star Mountain on the right, and the picture is taken from just off Highway 9 south of Hoosier Pass. Okay, I can stop showing off my Colorado bona fides now...) Where was I...oh yeah, GMD! Next week Kent Haines will show us "A Conceptual Approach to Teaching Integer Operations by Global Math Department."

Research Notes

Remember that really long list of new articles in last week's TWiME? You'll have to settle for looking at it again because I checked more than 30 journals and didn't find a single new math education article published in the last week. There's probably some things floating around in "online only" status, but I'll wait for them to be assigned to an issue before listing them here.

Math Ed in the News


Math Ed in Colorado

The deadline for submitting CCTM conference proposals is May 1!

The University of Northern Colorado is offering three graduate level math courses this summer as part of their Masters in Mathematics: Teaching Emphasis program. You don't have to be in the program to take the courses. A tentative schedule of courses through Spring 2018 and contact information is here.

Rebekah Ottenbreit from CDE's Office of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Education is offering two more sessions focused on helping math teachers and ESL/bilingual educators use tools and strategies to make mathematics content more accessible to English learners. You can grab a flyer here.
  • May 10, 2016, from 8:30-noon at the Pueblo City Schools Administration Building, Pueblo, CO (register by 5/5/16)
  • May 13, 2016, from 8:30-noon at the NW CO BOCES downstairs conference room in Steamboat Springs (register by 5/8/16)
The grand opening of the Geometry Park exhibit in Lafayette (201 S Bermot St) will be Wednesday, May 25th, from 2:00 to 4:00 pm. The park is supported by the Center for STEM Learning at CU-Boulder and you can read more about the park here.

See the Rocky Mountain Math Teachers' Circle website and the Northern Colorado Math Circles for information about upcoming events, including a joint workshop in Durango from August 8-11. You have until June 15 to apply for that one!

The "Expanding Your Horizons" symposium for middle school girls interested in STEM registration begins March 1.

NCTM is offering two summer institutes this summer in Denver:
Job openings:
  • Lake County School District in Leadville is looking for a 7th and 8th grade math teacher. If you are interested in joining a math department that combines Jo Boaler's work with Expeditionary Learning while living in a small town in the mountains, this job is for you. More information and an application can be found at their website.
  • Delta County is looking for a math teacher at Delta High School to teach upper-level math. Contact Todd Markley for details.
  • Hope Learning Academy is looking for secondary math teachers.

This Week in Math Ed: April 22, 2016

What a busy, busy post-conference week! I've been busy recapping ASSM, the NCTM Research Conference, and the NCTM Annual Meeting, and from the looks of it the rest of you have been writing and sharing, too. There's a ton of new literature below in the research journals!

Math Ed Said

April 15: Michael Fenton shared materials from his presentation at NCTM.

Shared by: Michael Fenton, Heather Kohn, Cathy Yenca, Andrew Gael, Charlotte Dunlap, Jonathan Klupp, Karyn Vogel, Turtle Gunn Toms, Elham Kazemi

April 16: Nine people shared Dylan Kane's post "Math Ability." It's a great thought-piece about whether math ability exists, or what form it takes, and if it has limits.

Shared by: Dylan Kane, Alex Overwijk, Anna Blinstein, Taylor Belcher, Bryan Meyer, Ilona Vashchyshyn, Patrick Honner, Andrew Gael, Steven Strogatz

Dan Meyer at ASSM 2016
April 17: Dan Meyer did us all a favor and bundled every handout and presentation from NCSM and NCTM 2016. Well, every posted handout and presentation, anyway. I'm one of those naughty presenters that didn't post his slides. (Some key images were broken on export and I haven't had a chance to fix them.)

Shared by: Nancy Terry, Dan Meyer, Bridget Dunbar, Laura Wagenman, Jennifer Blinzler, Glenn Waddell, Jr., Christine DiPaulo, Steve Wyborney, Michelle Rinehart

April 18: It's the Monday after NCTM 2016, so naturally people were sharing the link to proposal submissions for NCTM 2017.

Shared by: Suzanne Alejandre, Zak Champagne, Avery Pickford, Sarah Bush, Matt Larson, Kristin Gray, Carl Oliver, Christina, Janice Novakowski, Christina Sherman, NCTM, Janet Oien

April 19: Two blog posts tied with 10 (re)tweets a piece, and I'm really glad they did because I wouldn't want to have to decide which of these is the better post — they're both awesome! First, Tracy Zager tells a great story about her daughter's mathematical reasoning at Ghirardelli Square in San Francisco. Second, Jamie Duncan (@jamiedunc3) (who somehow wasn't on my math ed Twitter list!) wrote "First Grade Math Fight... Fractions, Proportional Reasoning, and Algebra, Oh my!." That post describes her rigorous and engaging approach to getting students to reason with fractions while considering wholes of different sizes. It ties together standards, multiple representations, class discussions, and cookies, and is what I consider to be a great example of what lesson reflection blogging can be.

Shared by: (for Tracy) Tracy Johnston Zager, Andrew Gael, casey, Brian Bushart, Sahar Khatri, Kent Haines, Tim Hudson, Susan Davidson, Shauna Hedgepeth, Simon Gregg; (for Jaime) Kyle Pearce, Dave Lanovaz, Simon Gregg, Brian Bushart, Matt Vaudrey, Teresa Teri Ryan, Andrew Busch, Mark Chubb, Brett Parker, Shannon Andrews

April 20: Jaime's post was quite popular this day, too, but so was another KQED MindShift story by Katrina Schwartz, "How 'Productive Failure' In Math Class Helps Make Lessons Stick."

Shared by: David Coffey, Maria H. Andersen, Jennifer Lawler, Donna Boucher, Jim Wysocki, Meg Tewey, Rusty Anderson, Mark Chubb

April 21: People liked Joe Schwartz's "Dot Crazy," his reflection on a great counting activity done with a third grade class. I dare you to not read a post that includes the line, "Math started gushing out all over the place."

Shared by: Joe Schwartz, Kristin Gray, Brian Bushart, Marilyn Burns, Bridget Dunbar, Steve Wyborney, Allison Hintz, Kent Haines, Simon Gregg, Janice Novakowski

Around the Math Ed Web

The Global Math Department brought a bunch of people to reflect on their NCTM experience.

Next week's GMD talk is "Coding in Math Class." Dawn DuPriest which will help us look at different ways for a beginning coder/programmer to get started.

Deadlines, deadlines, deadlines! If you want to present at these conferences, here are the due dates for proposals:

Research Notes

Here's another addition to the June 2016 issue of The Journal of Mathematical Behavior:
ZDM has their first issue of the year, a double-issue with the theme, "perception, interpretation and decision making: understanding the missing link between competence and performance." Sigrid Blömeke and Jon Star were the issue editors.
Add to this long list a couple new articles added to the July 2016 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education:
New in AERA Open:
Here are new articles in the Spring 2016 issue of the Journal of Mathematics Education at Teachers College. Remember, these are all open access!
I think while everybody was away and conferences all the editors of the above journals decided to hit their "publish" buttons. Whew!

Math Ed in the News


Math Ed in Colorado

I attended a CoMMIT meeting yesterday and had a great time learning about the group and doing a task posed to us by Kim Bunning, CU-Boulder CU-Teach master teacher. Some of the toughest questions about math ed I get are from special education teachers, and they also seem to be hungriest for the answers. I think I'm going to learn a lot from this group — far more than they'll learn from me, anyway.

Kim Bunning presenting at CoMMIT, 4/21/2016

The deadline for submitting CCTM conference proposals is May 1!

The University of Northern Colorado is offering three graduate level math courses this summer as part of their Masters in Mathematics: Teaching Emphasis program. You don't have to be in the program to take the courses. A tentative schedule of courses through Spring 2018 and contact information is here.

Rebekah Ottenbreit from CDE's Office of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Education is offering two more sessions focused on helping math teachers and ESL/bilingual educators use tools and strategies to make mathematics content more accessible to English learners. You can grab a flyer here.
  • May 10, 2016, from 8:30-noon at the Pueblo City Schools Administration Building, Pueblo, CO (register by 5/5/16)
  • May 13, 2016, from 8:30-noon at the NW CO BOCES downstairs conference room in Steamboat Springs (register by 5/8/16)
The grand opening of the Geometry Park exhibit in Lafayette (201 S Bermot St) will be Wednesday, May 25th, from 2:00 to 4:00 pm. The park is supported by the Center for STEM Learning at CU-Boulder and you can read more about the park here.

See the Rocky Mountain Math Teachers' Circle website and the Northern Colorado Math Circles for information about upcoming events, including a joint workshop in Durango from August 8-11. You have until June 15 to apply for that one!

The "Expanding Your Horizons" symposium for middle school girls interested in STEM registration begins March 1.

NCTM is offering two summer institutes this summer in Denver:
Job openings: